Brute force attack on wordpress might bring it down because password validation is hard

There were several discussions about how brute force attacks against WordPress can bring sites down. I have to admit that I didn’t believe that as I never seen anything like that happen and I could not think of any reason for it.

On the face of it handling a login request is very similar to handling any other page request with the small additional cost of one query to the DB that gets the password to authenticate against. Oh boy how wrong I was.

First  it turned out that because of the way the internal data structures are organized, WordPress will try to get all the data associated with the user being authenticated which means that there will be at least two queries instead of one, and it seems like the total time querying the DB doubles. Then, you get into the password validation process which according to security principals is designed to be slow mathematical computation. The mathematical computation is what demands the CPU to work harder which at the end might bring down sites.

I still find it hard to believe that a properly administered site will be brought down that way but at least now it makes theoretical sense.

There is one important thing that I observed while investigating the issue. When trying to login with a user that do not exists the CPU cost is about 20 times lower then the CPU cost when trying to login with a proper user (very non scientific measurement), but the interesting thing is that when trying to login with a valid user, it costs the same if the password was authenticated or not.

Which brings us to the point of user enumeration attacks against wordpress and why core developers are doing a mistake by not addressing it. If it is hard to guess the valid users, an hacker will try all kinds of user/password combinations and it seems like there is a very big chance that most attempt will be against non existing users which are “cheaper” to handle, but if there is an easy way to find out what are the valid users, the attacker will direct all attempts at those users and even if they fail they do cost relatively a lot of CPU to handle.

Sounds like until the core developers will get a grip, an user enumeration prevention plugin is a good thing to have.

 

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